Friday, 15 October 2004

Take a load off Annie

Exegesis of one of my favourite songs, The Band's "The Weight", complete with Buñuel references. Ah, enlightenment.

Lyrics to "The Weight". And yes, it is "Fanny", not "Annie", in the chorus.

Edit: actually, apparently the Fanny/Annie thing is a topic of much debate. Dagnabit, and I thought I had clarity. There's some metanalysis going on, but in which direction?



I can probably leave a analysis of the single pronunciation if you want. In the "take a load off" part, there is no audible "f" between the delay of off and annie. Also, the verse that is claimed to have it clearly audable isn't clearly audable at all. I took a look at it the same way I found the previous one (in audacity, a wave editor) and found a very large looking distort. The kind of distort you find when audio recordings mix up a little bit. It does have a sort of "f" sound, but is clearly part of a beat. So I would have to say it is "annie".


If you listen to one of the last verses they clearly say "Fanny". My bag is sinking low, and I do believe its time...to get back to miss fanny...


I thought the lyric was "vannie"...


Are you people idiots?, listen to the whole song, in the third verse it says:

"Well, Luke, my friend, what about young Anna Lee"

He said, "Do me a favor, son, won't ya stay and keep Anna Lee company?"

Take it from an old hippie that was madly in love with a woman that named her daughter Anna Lee based on the song.

I think her listening to the song a thousand times on the original turntable in a syncope like state makes her an expert.


Post a Comment

Create a Link